Tag Archives: universities

Unis to face high degree of change in mobile era

Student looking at laptop

GOOGLE’S chief technology advocate Michael Jones has a vision for global education in which the world’s best professors will be movie stars.

They will sell the best online courses that money and whiz-bangery can buy to universities which will charge students to be examined on their rebranded version of it.

Mr Jones says ”a mobile phone could become a university” because the point where students and educators meet is moving online. So the multibillion-dollar campus expansions under way at Australian universities might turn out to be short sighted.

Full Text: Unis to face high degree of change in mobile era.

Digital media get top marks as they bring a new kind of learning into the classroom

Teacher with students in a computer lab

Figures just released from Ofcom’s annual communications market report highlighted the fact that last year, for the first time, the amount of time we spent talking on mobile phones fell. However, that doesn’t mean we’re not communicating: the report also suggested that some 96 per cent of 16- to 24-year-olds are using digital media to stay in touch with friends and family on a daily basis.

Given that, it’s hardly surprising that digital and social media are becoming more and more widely used in schools and universities.

In fact, institutions around the UK are bringing students new learning experiences via digital media. A recent example saw 9,000 students from 140 schools watch a webcast of Tim Crouch’s play I, Cinna, based on the misadventures of a lowly character from Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, then writing their own poems and prose in response and taking part in a live Q&A with the actor and director.

Full Text: Digital media get top marks as they bring a new kind of learning into the classroom – Education – News – Evening Standard.

Why Isn’t iTunes U Seeing Massive Adoption?

iTunes U

Apple made a big splash in NYC in January when it announced an improved iTunes U application. Once simply a section of the iTunes store, Apple relaunched iTunes U as a dedicated app for iOS devices. As Phil Schiller, a senior vice president at Apple, explained, iTunes U courses enable “anyone anywhere at any time to take courses for free.”

iTunes U expanded by adding new features to simplify course management. In doing so, Apple went head-to-head with existing learning management systems like Blackboard. Using the iTunes U software platform, K-12 and higher education instructors can manage entire courses; instructors can post class announcements, material in various formats, homework, and class information. At the time of the announcement, iTunes U already had 1000 universities using it and 700 million downloads.

Following the announcement, many suggested that iTunes U would be the future of college education—the de facto platform that would give any student, anywhere, access to high quality education material. Considering all the hype about this great product, why is it that the country’s top universities have instead decided to take a different approach to online learning?

Full Text: Why iTunes U Isn’t Seeing Massive Adoption by Universities | edcetera – Rafter Blog.

Thumbnail

How Higher Education Uses Social Media [INFOGRAPHIC]

Via Mashable

Schools are on a short list of organizations that have been notoriously slow to adopt emerging tech. But within the last few years, as social media becomes more integral to students’ lives, educational institutions are finally catching on, and catching up. When it comes to higher ed, there are not only opportunities for digital learning, but digital marketing too. Some schools have taken the reigns on both sides, with mixed results. SEE ALSO: 5 Free Homework Management Tools for the Digital Student The infographic below takes a look at how schools have fared with social media over the last few years — what platforms are best, where they’ve succeeded, and the challenges that lay ahead. Does your alma mater use social media effectively in the classroom and in the recruitment office? Share your social ed story in the comments. Infographic by onlineuniversities.com . Image courtesy of iStockphoto , YinYang More About: college , education , infographics , Social Media For more Social Media coverage: Follow Mashable Social Media on Twitter Become a Fan on Facebook Subscribe to the Social Media channel Download our free apps for Android , Mac , iPhone and iPad

Link:
How Higher Education Uses Social Media [INFOGRAPHIC]

Open University learning is a joy | Jules Horne

Via The Guardian:

It may not have the nightlife but as a way of accessing a flexible, quality education, I’ve found the Open University can’t be beaten He was a flying goth with rocker looks. I was a new Open University tutor researching a play. I ventured into the OU room in Second Life , and after a few introductions (He: F04 R08 . AL? Me: Yep. A363 . R11), we had a long chat about non-Euclidean geometry. Call me strange, but I found this amazingly thrilling. Living in a rural area, you don’t come across many Gauss experts. Vast academic libraries, with international journals on tap, books and courses to get your brain cranking, people who enjoy a good barney about Shakespeare’s sonnets: the OU has brought all that to my doorstep, and it’s been an absolute joy. A quick straw poll reveals quite a few of my friends are closet OU students – they just haven’t mentioned it. All over the country, distance learning is helping students overcome not just geography, but also disability, culture, financial and family circumstances. Susanne Lockie, a full-time mother to three children, told me the mental stimulation has made it a lifesaver: “I need to keep my skills ticking over, but I couldn’t study to a high level without that flexibility. I’ve been able to get credit for my previous full-time study in nursing, which was interrupted when I had a family. I’ve finished my Open degree now, but I need to spend more time with my parents at the moment, so I’m taking a year out before starting on honours.” Employers tend to be supportive of OU study, knowing that OU students are likely to be unusually determined and committed. That’s why it’s all the more disappointing when you hear lazy “not a real degree, then” comments and ancient stereotypes of tweedy tutors and chalk-and-talk TV. I’ve found the quality of OU learning materials outstanding. The modular structure means you cover the ground systematically, with a clear understanding of context. Elsewhere (I studied at Oxford), I’ve found the learning experience equally stimulating, but much more haphazard.

Read the article:
Open University learning is a joy | Jules Horne

From video marking to Second Life, technology is transforming the options for online students

Via The Guardian:

From video marking to Second Life, technology is transforming the options for online students There’s not a red pen in sight when Russell Stannard marks his master’s students’ essays – but it’s not because the students never make mistakes. Stannard doesn’t use a pen, or even paper, to give his students feedback. Instead – and in keeping with his role as principal lecturer in multimedia and ICT – he turns on his computer, records himself marking the work on-screen, then emails his students the video. When students open the video, they can hear Stannard’s voice commentary as well as watch him going through the process of marking. The resulting feedback is more comprehensive than the more conventional notes scrawled in the margin, and Stannard, who works at the University of Westminster, now believes it has the potential to revolutionise distance learning. “It started when I began to realise how useful technology can be for teaching,” he says. “I wanted to help other teachers, as well as general computer-users, to learn how to use tools like podcasting, PowerPoint and BlackBoard, software that a lot of schools and universities use to allow teachers to provide course material and communicate with students online.” Follow the mouse So he set up a site to teach people how to use the technology, providing simple, video tutorials where users watch Stannard’s mouse pointing out how to use the software, with his voice providing constant commentary. He used the screen-videoing software Camtasia, and the site rapidly took off: it now receives more than 10,000 hits a month. Then he started considering integrating the teaching style into his own university work. “I was mainly teaching students on master’s courses in media and technology, and I realised that while I was talking about the benefits of new technology, I should be making the most of the opportunity to use it,” says Stannard. “That’s when I had the idea of video marking. It was immediately well received. Students receive both aural and visual feedback – and while we always talk about different learning styles, there are also benefits to receiving feedback in different ways.” Stannard says the technology is particularly useful for dyslexic students, who appreciate the spoken commentary, and students learning English as a foreign language. “I started my teaching career in language learning, so I quickly realised that students learning English would benefit from video marking. They can replay the videos as many times as they like and learn more about reasons for their mistakes.” Stannard also believes video marking is “perfect” for distance-learning students. “It brings them much closer to the teacher,” he says. “They can listen, see and understand how the teacher is marking their piece, why specific comments have been made, and so on.” The technology is already being used for informal distance learning, as Stannard uploads the videos he makes for his lectures at Westminster to multimedia trainingvideos.com.

See the article here:
From video marking to Second Life, technology is transforming the options for online students

Colleges stumble on to the Twitter scene

Via The Guardian:

Further education colleges are starting to catch on to social messaging. Sort of Are you a member of the Twitterati? You’ve heard of MySpace and you’re probably a whiz when it comes to Facebook, but it seems that we should be all of “a-Twitter” now. Twitter is the website on which users post statements called “tweets”, which can have up to 140 characters. More than 300,000 tweets are already sent every day in the UK. The actor Stephen Fry is one famous exponent, and MPs have jumped on the bandwagon too. Jim Knight, the schools minister, is a regular tweeter, whose recent posts range from the inane “realised I never had that pancake yesterday – does that mean I can ignore Lent?” to the more waspish “wondering for how much longer we’ll have to listen to Michael Gove”. The further education minister, Siôn Simon, has just started tweeting and the higher education minister, David Lammy, even appeared on the BBC’s One Show extolling Twitter’s virtues. Now even a few further education colleges have caught on. Sort of. When it comes to writing succinctly, we further education sorts do struggle. We’re used to using eight words when one would do, and flabby paragraphs with 50-word sentences. And we do love our jargon. Twitter pioneers include Deeside College, Havering College, Regents College, Sunderland College and my own college, Cornwall. Breaking news News of the Chinese earthquake last year broke on Twitter, as did the first images of the US Airways plane that had to crash-land in New York’s Hudson river and last week’s crash at Schipol airport near Amsterdam

Excerpt from:
Colleges stumble on to the Twitter scene

Thumbnail

Teachers must think internet-first

Via The Guardian:

Giving everyone digital skills is a key factor in tackling long-term unemployment, argues Martha Lane Fox Last week, the CBI pressed the government to apply the same rigour to tackling long-term unemployment as it has shown to reducing the deficit. The scale of the challenge certainly warrants such a focus. In the UK, 2.46 million people are unemployed; 5 million people of working age are on benefits and 2 million children live in households where nobody works. These statistics carry a huge economic and social cost: for society and government, for families and for the individual.

View post:
Teachers must think internet-first