Tag Archives: Technology in Schools

Poll Finds Support For Use Of Technology

Hands in the air

The Leading Education by Advancing Digital (LEAD) Commission, a non-governmental organization exploring the opportunity to use technology to improve education in the United States, released poll results today that found that the majority of parents and teachers of K-12 students support greater use of technology in education. In addition, the poll found that these audiences increasingly believe that school systems should be doing more to improve access to technology in education.

Here are other highlights of the poll findings:

  • 96 percent of teachers and 92 percent of parents believe that schools’ integration of technology in teaching and learning is important to the education of American students today
  • 54 percent of teachers and 64 percent of parents believe that the role of technology in educating students will become much more important during the next 10 years
  • 61 percent of teachers and 63 percent of parents responded that the country is somewhat or far behind the curve when it comes to American public schools’ use of technology in education
  • 82 percent of teachers and 71 percent of parents believe a greater use of technology would be helpful in connecting learning inside and outside of the classroom
  • 89 percent of teachers and 76 percent of parents would choose to spend $200 per student for an Internet-connected device over $200 per student for new science textbooks
  • 82 percent of teachers believe that they are not receiving the necessary training to use technology to its fullest potential in the classroom (our emphasis)
  • 95 percent of teachers and 90 percent of parents believe that home access to high-speed Internet gives students a big or moderate advantage when it comes to classroom performance

“The poll results shine a light on the importance of providing more access to technology in our classrooms,” said Jim Steyer, LEAD Commissioner and Founder and CEO of Common Sense Media. “A greater belief among parents and teachers that technology has the power to transform the K-12 education experience can truly accelerate the digital learning movement.”

Led by Geoff Garin of Hart Research Associates, the nationwide poll was conducted via telephone with 883 parents of K-12 students from Aug. 7-13 using random sampling techniques. The parents’ poll also included an oversample of 200 low-income parents, with a margin of error of +/- 3.3 at the 95 percent confidence interval. In addition, 812 public school K-12 teachers nationwide were polled via an online survey from Aug. 9-15, including a margin of error of +/- 3.4 at the 95 percent confidence interval. The complete poll findings can be viewed here.

[Again and again I hear teachers say they need more training to feel competent in using technology. I was hearing this 30 years ago and it doesn’t seem to improve. I do think teachers have to take some responsibility and be active users themselves, but there is obviously a need for more in-service training.]

Full Text: Poll Finds Support For Use Of Technology | LEAD Commission.

6 Obstacles to Using Technology in Schools

NMC Horizon Report

Though educators are finding smart ways to integrate technology and learning, the road has been and continues to be challenging on multiple fronts. The NMC Horizon Report: 2012 K-12 Edition, a collaboration between the New Media Consortium, the Consortium for School Networking, and the International Society for Technology in Education, takes the birds-eye view and encapsulates some of the significant challenges that must still be addressed and offers the following assessment.

Behind the challenges listed here is also a pervasive sense that local and organizational constraints are likely the most important factors in any decision to adopt — or not to adopt — a given technology. Even K-12 institutions that are eager to adopt new technologies may be constrained by school policies, the lack of necessary human resources, and the financial wherewithal to realize their ideas. Still others are located within buildings that simply were not designed to provide the radio frequency transparency that wireless technologies require, and thus find themselves shut out of many potential technology options. While acknowledging that local barriers to technology adoptions are many and significant, the advisory board focused its discussions on challenges that are common to the K-12 community as a whole. The highest ranked challenges they identified are listed here, in the order in which the advisory board ranked them.

  1. Digital media literacy continues its rise in importance as a key skill in every discipline and profession, especially teaching.
  2. K-12 must address the increased blending of formal and informal learning.
  3. The demand for personalized learning is not adequately supported by current technology or practices.
  4. Institutional barriers present formidable challenges to moving forward in a constructive way with emerging technologies.
  5. Learning that incorporates real life experiences is not occurring enough and is undervalued when it does take place.
  6. Many activities related to learning and education take place outside the walls of the classroom and thus are not part of traditional learning metrics.

The report can be read in full by registering here, and can be accessed on mobile devices here.

Full Text: Six Lingering Obstacles to Using Technology in Schools | MindShift.