Tag Archives: Technology

Flipping the teacher

If I’d suggested flipping the teacher while I was still at school, I would have been in serious trouble. Given my reputation though, it wouldn’t have been out of the ordinary.

I once spread a rumour at primary school that my tyrant of a head teacher had died (wishful thinking), and when he came back from sick leave, I wasn’t the most popular child in the school. Having said that, many of the kids began to believe in the resurrection of the dead.

Once, during a chemistry lesson in secondary school, I was larking around and accidentally burnt a big hole in my teacher’s pretty floral dress with concentrated acid.

He was furious.

I got into a fair few scrapes and a lot of mischief, but suggesting that we ‘flip the teacher’ would have been the last straw.

Today, the idea of flipping the classroom is a familiar one. Flipping teachers may not be so familiar. Don’t panic though – I’m not advocating violence, nor am I suggesting children use obscene gestures. Flipping teachers is about swapping roles. I have already written about this in previous posts. The idea that teachers should become students so that their students can act as teachers may still be contentious and problematic, but I believe that as we see more flipped classroom approaches, the argument for also flipping the role of the teacher will become more compelling, and eventually more acceptable.

A little history: Aaron Sams and Jonathan Bergmann developed the term ‘flipped classroom’ by considering the time spent by teachers with their students in classroom. They wished to maximise this time, and developed a number of strategies that involved instruction taking place outside the walls of the classroom. Inside, with the teacher present, students were able to explore their learning in more depth and detail, capitalising on ‘face time’ with the expert. The work of Harvard University professor Eric Mazur supports this approach, because, as he says – instruction is easier than assimilation, and advocated coaching rather than lecturing as early as the 1990s. This is not new of course. For centuries, innovative teachers have been trying to find other more effective methods of pedagogy that can take the place of lecturing and instruction.

If we are at all serious about promoting student centred learning, then we should at least reconsider the roles teachers traditionally play at the centre of the process, and begin to discover how we can help the student replace them. This does not mean that teachers relinquish their responsibilities or shirk their obligations. What it does mean is that teachers should seriously consider new forms of pedagogy where students are placed at the centre of the learning process, and have to spend some time ‘teaching’. We learn by teaching. If you have to teach or present something for an audience, you will make damn sure you go away and learn it thoroughly so you don’t make an absolute ass of yourself. This is the same principle we see when we flip the teacher.

Here are just five ways you can flip the teacher:

  1. Ask students to peer-teach. This form of paragogy ensures that all students need to know something about the topic before they teach it, and can also learn from each other during the process. Even better, get them to teach you something you don’t already know about.
  2. Give your students a problem to solve. Ask them to come back later to show how they solved the problem, and get them to defend their solution. If they all have different solutions, the fun can start.
  3. Students create a self-directed project that encapsulates the principles or facts of the topic they are learning. It can be in the form of a video, or presentation, or role play, or even a blues song (be creative). Just as long as they ‘perform’ their work in front of an audience.
  4. Act as a student, and ask your students awkward questions about what they have learnt. Challenge them to explain clearly what they know. This approach ensures that they must think more critically and reflectively about what they have learnt, and that they need to justify their decisions.
  5. The age old seminar is a great flipping method. Ensure that each student has time to study a specific aspect of the course, and prepares teaching materials. They then get to present their work in front of you and their peer group, and are also tasked to encourage discussion by preparing some key questions.

I gratefully acknowledge Max Brown for giving me permission to use his most excellent cartoon that depicts flipping the teacher.

Graphic by Max Brown

Creative Commons License
Flipping the teacher by Steve Wheeler is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

YouTube in the classroom: A new necessity?

* YouTube

Some say YouTube’s library of educational content allows educators to teach more creatively

Teachers are increasingly incorporating videos from YouTube’s education channel into classroom lessons.

Districts are dropping bans on YouTube and allowing students and teachers access to the site’s educational videos. Paving the way in this shift in policy are large districts like Chicago and Broward County, Fla.

YouTube’s library of educational content allows educators to teach more creatively, says Angela Lin, manager of YouTube’s Education Partnerships. “After learning the same way for hundreds of years, educators are now redefining educational experiences to make them more fun and powerful by taking advantage of today’s technology, especially video,” she says.

On the site’s education channel, YouTube EDU, teachers can search videos by subject or categories such as primary and secondary education, and university. The channel, which has more than 2.6 million subscribers, has hundreds of thousands of free educational videos from PBS, TED, and other organizations.

More YouTube in the classroom: A new necessity? | District Administration Magazine.

Webinar: Embracing Technology To Promote Exceptional Student Services In Higher Education

Embracing Technology To Promote Exceptional Student Services In Higher Education

Wednesday, June 5, 3:00-4:30pm EDT

online webinar

Host: Innovative Educators

http://www.innovativeeducators.org/product_p/1036.htm

NOTE: Payment is not required prior to event date. The recording is included and is accessible for one full year.

OVERVIEW

This webinar will offer participants an overview of the online self-services and other technology initiatives that higher education institutions are
developing and providing for their students and their families. Learn more about how technology is shaping the student experience with financial aid, electronic billing and payments, graduation planning, and more. Through strategic design and implementation of technology tools, administrators can promote increased efficiencies, improve retention and graduation rates, and promote student success.

The presenter will discuss various online student self-services and web applications that have proved successful for students to help manage the business of being a student, including a look into student portals and mobile device initiatives that have been developed to provide personalized information and communications to students. Online views of various University of Minnesota web applications and technology tools that have been highly successful in terms of quality student services and creating efficiencies will also be reviewed.

OBJECTIVES

  • Self-service options that institutions have developed to assist with customer service strategies including self-service financial aid planning,
    registration/graduation planning, and customer service relationship software
  • How to leverage technology into seamless self-service Web applications that bring students from “in line” to “online”
  • Examples of cutting-edge technology initiatives for student services including student portals and mobile device initiatives
  • About specific web applications and technology tools that have been highly successful at the University of Minnesota

WHO IS THE SPEAKER?

Julie Selander has worked in higher education administration and finance for over 25 years. Her experience includes student loan servicing operations, tuition payment plan sales and marketing, organizational leadership, as well as various management positions in higher education student services including student accounts receivable, billing, collections, financial aid, and customer service.

Julie is the director of the One Stop Student Services Office at the University of Minnesota providing seamless and integrated student services in the areas of enrollment, registration, financial aid, billing, student accounts receivable, and student veterans services. Twenty-seven One Stop Counselors across three campus locations provide service via phone, e-mail, and in-person for over 51,000 students on the Twin Cities campus.

Julie presents frequently on various topics related to higher education student services and has written several articles for publication, including NACUBO’s Student Centered Financial Services: Innovations That Succeed. She serves as a board member for Minnesota’s College Goal Sunday initiative and is a founding member and on the board of directors for the Institute for Student Services Professionals. She has undergraduate and master’s degrees from the University of Minnesota and is currently working on her dissertation as a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Minnesota in the Higher Education Policy and Administration program. She is also an instructor at the University of Minnesota in the Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Administration department and teaches Customer Service Training to undergraduate students.

Enquiries: pam@ieinfo.org

Web address: http://www.innovativeeducators.org/product_p/1036.htm

Sponsored by: Innovative Educators

New model to teach teachers about technology

 

Boulder Valley to use new model to teach teachers about technology - Boulder Daily Camera

The Boulder Valley School District has three people assigned to help teachers at 55 schools figure out how to integrate technology into their classrooms.

Looking for a better way to use limited resources, a committee of teachers, principals and community members spent a year developing a vision and researching programs in school districts nationwide. The group settled on a model in which small groups of teachers will receive extensive training and then serve as mentors to other teachers in their schools.

“It’s a good new direction,” said Boulder Valley educational technology manager Kelly Sain, who worked with a similar model in two other school districts. “The enthusiasm from our teachers has been huge.”

Full Text: Boulder Valley to use new model to teach teachers about technology – Boulder Daily Camera.

‘Magic Pen’ Helps High School Teachers Dig Deeper Into Math Lessons

Teacher writing on blackboard

Pretend you’re a high school student getting your nightly Facebook fix. As you scroll through your news feed, what do you see? Photos, gossip, YouTube videos, and calculus homework.

Wait, what? Homework on Facebook?

For students in Donna Noll’s calculus and algebra classes, that’s exactly what they see—and hear. A veteran math teacher at Seminole High School in Sanford, Fla., Noll posts overviews and sample questions recorded on her so-called “magic pen” to her fan page, SemiNoll Math. She uses Livescribe’s smartpen­, which records her voice, as well as what she writes, and combines the two into a PDF, creating a pencast.

Full Text: ‘Magic Pen’ Helps High School Teachers Dig Deeper Into Math Lessons – High School Notes (usnews.com).

8 Great Free Google Posters for your Classroom

Poster

So you want to start your next school year with a great new look for your classroom ? A look that will be technology enhanced ? Well, we have suggestions for you: [Google] posters. Posters are a great way to catch students attention  and stimulate their learning drive . When used on the classroom wall for everyone  to look at whenever they are at your class, then you can have better chances that students will grasp what those posters communicate to them.

[Provides links to the posters in PDF format]

Full Text: Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: 8 Great Free Technology Posters to Hang in your Classroom.

Logging On: High-Tech Study Habits

Students studying

Technology is changing education — influencing everything from study habits to how students attend class — and benefits are substantial and sometimes unexpected.

Gone are the days when pens, pencils and college-ruled notebooks served as the key ingredients for scholarly preparation. Today students without laptops could be left behind as higher education adopts e-books, online study halls, digital tutors and a variety of innovative study aids.

As universities, high schools and other learning centers implement more technology, they are discovering how digital tools can help reinforce solid study habits by monitoring online time, preventing plagiarism and even increasing attendance.

Full Text: Logging On: High-Tech Study Habits – Mobiledia.

Ten Ideas for Teaching Teachers Technology

Monique Flickinger

I had never been to an “unconference” before, but when I heard the organizer of SocialEdCon Unconference introduce the event, I knew I was in for something new:

“Write your ideas that you want to discuss on the top of the poster board. Each of you can look at all of the ideas and put check marks beside the ones that interest you, and then that will drive the topics that we discuss today.”

I leaned over to my husband, Brad Flickinger, an “unconference expert,” and whispered that I’d love to learn more about educating teachers about technology. He told me to go up and write it down. Fifteen minutes later after the milling crowds of educators thinned out from around the poster boards, I saw my idea surrounded by checkmarks. The organizer announced that Teaching Teachers about Technology would begin in five minutes on the right side of the room, and could the person who wrote the idea down please moderate and share at that session.

I gulped!

I was here to learn from others — not lead a session — but I jumped into the deep end of the pool of unconferencing.

[Read on for the great tips Monique Flickinger shared and gained from her first unconference experience]

Full Text: Ten Ideas for Teaching Teachers Technology | Edutopia.

Mobile Technology in Radiology Resident Education

Fun with X-Rays and Gigantic Arms.


Aiham C. Korbage, MD, Harprit S. Bedi, MD

Department of Radiology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts

Journal of the American College of Radiology

Volume 9, Issue 6 , Pages 426-429, June 2012

Purpose

The authors hypothesized that ownership of a mobile electronic device would result in more time spent learning radiology. Current trends in radiology residents’ studying habits, their use of electronic and printed radiology learning resources, and how much of the funds allotted to them are being used toward printed vs electronic education tools were assessed in this study.

Methods

A survey study was conducted among radiology residents across the United States from June 13 to July 5, 2011. Program directors listed in the Association of Program Directors in Radiology e-mail list server received an e-mail asking for residents to participate in an online survey. The questionnaire consisted of 12 questions and assessed the type of institution, the levels of training of the respondents, and book funds allocated to residents. It also assessed the residents’ study habits, access to portable devices, and use of printed and electronic radiology resources.

Results

Radiology residents are adopters of new technologies, with 74% owning smart phones and 37% owning tablet devices. Respondents spend nearly an equal amount of time learning radiology from printed textbooks as they do from electronic resources. Eighty-one percent of respondents believe that they would spend more time learning radiology if provided with tablet devices.

Conclusions

There is considerable use of online and electronic resources and mobile devices among the current generation of radiology residents. Benefits, such as more study time, may be obtained by radiology programs that incorporate tablet devices into the education of their residents.

Full Text: Mobile Technology in Radiology Resident Education.

Technology Offers Opportunities & Challenges for Substitute Teachers

Not all substitute teachers benefit from classroom technology.
Not all substitute teachers benefit from classroom technology.

Some substitute teachers say that technology provided by classroom teachers can help them facilitate learning. “The teachers [will] leave stuff on their computer, which goes directly to the SMART Board…,” said Susan May, a substitute. “You can go on the computer and pull up whatever they need you to. Those are really nice substitute days.”

For other substitute teachers classroom technology presents challenges – not being familiar with school policies and not being trained to use the devices. 

How are your substitutes coping, and what are you doing to help?

Full Text: Technology Offers Opportunities, Challenges for Substitute Teachers – US News and World Report.

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4 tips for getting to grips with technology

childs play sign

Having trouble grasping new technology? Go about it like a kid.

Whether we are just starting out with e-learning technology or have been taking distance education courses for years, we are always faced with a constant stream of new technology to understand and utilize in order to get things done. Many of us grew up with the internet, and many others watched it grow and slowly begin to change our daily lives. This is something that, once in a while, we mention to our kids. Trying as hard as possible not to sound like we’re lecturing about walking ten miles to school in six feet of snow, we say that, even just fifteen years ago, there was no iPod. This is something that your kids could really care less about, as they pore over their own tech gadgets, learning processes and finding features that you never even knew existed.

So, how is it that kids can learn new technology so quickly? It can seem so complicated for us to break down, and our kids seem to pick up a never-before-seen gadget or game and learn the thing completely within the hour. When it comes to learning new technology, this is actually no fluke. The way a child goes about learning technology is very different from the way an adult faces it. And, we have to admit, there is something to be said for how quickly kids can grasp tech nuances. With that in mind, if you want to forever change the way you see new technology, take a cue from the children in your life, and try things a little differently.

First, start with an open mind. This is the most important difference between the way adults and kids look at technology. Kids start from a place of openness and slowly learn new technology as its very own entity. Adults start with a mindset that is automatically trying to define something new by comparing it to what they have seen and experienced before. This is the first way to limit yourself when it comes to learning new technology. Next time, don’t box in a new product or method by trying to characterize it. Simply approach it with a completely open mind, and you may begin to find ways to use this technology that you have never considered.

Second, explore. When you approach technology with an open mind, you need to forget everything that you already know. Instead of automatically trying to find the area for search, or data storage, or video-making, pretend that you have no idea what this product is actually supposed to do. Just explore it, instead, and it will present itself to you, rather than the other way around. It is by exploring that we are able to truly learn.

Third, let the technology teach you. You don’t need a user manual for technology to present itself to you. The best way to learn is by doing. So simply allow a program to walk you through its intended use. This will make you more connected with the technology and more able to use it with finesse and ease. Instead of figuring out what you want to do with the technology and then learning the processes for those one or two goals, you will be able to learn so much more by exploring and learning from the technology itself.

Finally, play. You can’t learn if you’re not actually interested in what you’re doing. If you’re learning a new technology, try to generate some form of challenge in what you’re doing. Maybe you simply want to beat your own best score in a new game, or maybe you want to figure out how to do footnotes in the fastest way for your writing style. Challenge yourself to do your best, and you will be mobilized to use the technology to its fullest capabilities.

While there is no way we can completely erase our adult natures and grasp technology with exactly the same ease as a child, the most important thing is not to let yourself feel overwhelmed by it. Simply let go, explore, let it teach you, and have fun, and you’re sure to have an experience with new technology that you’ve never had before.


About the author: Kristie Lewis is from construction management degree. You can reach her at: Kristie.Lewis81@gmail.com.

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