Tag Archives: Social Media

Should social media be banned in school because of a few inappropriate uses?

Unlike

The Internet arrived with both a bang and bubble. Once social media platforms came into being, sites including Facebook and Twitter began to permeate every facet of life. With the phenomenon’s expansion, it raised a number of issues involving privacy, protection and responsibility.
Teachers are not exempt from these concerns. By being in a position of power and working with adolescents, their behavior is often scrutinized thoroughly. Naturally, if something happens to a child when they are in the care of the school, it is the organization and staff member who are liable. In relation to the Internet, not only is cyberbullying an issue — especially when conducted on school grounds — but social media is considered by some as an inappropriate way for teacher and student to communicate.
Therein lies the problem. Social media provides quick and effective communication, but perhaps is a ‘too-open’ channel that schools and parents might not be able to regulate. In a minority of cases, the teacher-student relationship line has been crossed, but is this really enough of a reason to ban an effective teaching tool from class?
Full Text: When do students and teachers cross the line through social media? | ZDNet.

Survey examines how prospective students use social media to research colleges

About two-thirds of high school students use social media to research colleges, and more than one-third of those students use social media to help decide where to enroll, according to a survey conducted by Zinch, an online scholarship- and school-matching service run by Chegg, and Inigral, a tech company that focuses on student engagement online.
Of the more than 7,000 students surveyed, nearly three-quarters said they check Facebook at least once per day, while more than half never use Twitter, the next-most-visited network. Pinterest, Tumblr, and Instagram were even less popular. A study published in The Journal of College Admission that looked at the top 100 colleges and universities, as ranked by U.S. News & World Report, found that universities use an average of 3.7 social networks, with one university using as many as seven different sites.
Gil Rogers, director of College Outreach for Zinch, said universities should look at the results from the student survey and perhaps reconsider their social media strategy. “While it might be free to create accounts on these new, popular social media sites, universities should focus recruitment efforts on where they’re going to get the highest return on investment,” he said.
 
Full Text: Survey examines how prospective students use social media to research colleges | Inside Higher Ed.

12 Things Students Should Never Do on Social Media

Student with laptop

The last thing young people want is another set of rules. But these days, social media comes with great responsibility, whether you’re just starting high school or finishing up college.
The fact is, irresponsible social media conduct could potentially ruin your education and negatively impact your career, not to mention hurt others in the process. (And we’re not just talking kids, either.) But most of those consequences are preventable, often with just a little foresight.
We’ve pinpointed 12 social media mistakes that students should avoid at all costs, because after all, it’s never as simple as “be responsible.” And it’s never as finite as “don’t friend your teacher on Facebook.” Social media circumstances are nuanced and vary by situation, school and user.
Full Text: 12 Things Students Should Never Do on Social Media.

Helping New Teachers with Twitter

Wonderwoman flying

Every Wednesday at 5 p.m. PT, 8 p.m. ET, I host New Teacher Chat (#ntchat) on Twitter. It’s a time for new and pre-service teachers, as well as supportive administrators and experienced teachers, to gather online and have discussions about topics that are practitioner focused and supportive for the soon-to-be teacher.
A recent topic was one that is always near and dear to my heart — back to school — tips to make your first day/week/year great.
This time of year can be particularly stressful for new teachers as they embark on the first steps of their careers. Our chat about starting the year, which armed new teachers with supportive strategies to avoid the back-to-school jitters, was engaging and collaborative.
Full Text: Helping New Teachers Beat the Back-to-School Jitters with Twitter | Edutopia.

Free webinar: Learning the 21st century way: Making sense of how to use social media for learning

In this one-hour webinar, I’ll share exactly how I incorporated social media (and in particular, Twitter) into one of my classes. I’ll share what worked, what didn’t and what you can do in your own teaching or training practice to effectively integrate social media ‐ and why you might want to.
Over the past decade social media has changed how individuals connect online and share information and how organizations interact with stakeholders and customers. Did you know that social media is now being incorporated into learning programs from Kindergarten right on up through adult education? Does it really add any value to the learning process?
By the end of the webinar you will:

  • Have a basic understanding of how social media can add value to your learning programs
  • Gain insight into how to incorporate social media into a lesson plan
  • Get ideas on how to assess activities using social media
  • Get ideas on how to incorporate social media into your own learning programs

There will be time for questions at the end of the webinar.
This free webinar is sponsored by Essential Skills Ontario. Here are the details:
Date: Tuesday, August 21st, 2012
Time:
10:00 a.m. Pacific Time (Vancouver, BC)
11:00 a.m. Mountain Time (Calgary, AB)
1:00 p.m.  Eastern Time (Toronto, ON)
2:00 p.m. – Atlantic Time (Halifax, NS)
6:00 p.m. – British Summer Time (London U.K.)
7:00 p.m. – Eastern European Time (Cairo, Egypt)
It’s free for you to join in, but you must register, since there are only 100 spots available.  Click here to register.
Full Text: Free webinar: Learning the 21st century way: Making sense of how to use social media for learning « Literacy, Languages and Leadership.

Social media for schools: a guide to Twitter, Facebook and Pinterest

Facebook Like drawn with chalk on Blackboard

Using social media in schools doesn’t have to be scary. Here, Matt Britland shares his tips for managing school accounts and some examples good practice
Like, tweet, pin? Social media use in education is still causing debate. Do you use it in the classroom? Let us know how.
The use of social media in education continues to be something of a hot topic with arguments both for and against.
So I carried out a small survey of 27 teaching professionals in order to create a baseline of understanding into the use (or not) of social networking in schools, and also any concerns over some of the e-safety risks. The full survey results can be found here.
There are many uses of social media in education – below are just a few of the ways they can be effectively used.
Full Text: Social media for schools: a guide to Twitter, Facebook and Pinterest | Teacher Network Blog | Guardian Professional.

25 Ways To Integrate Social Media Into Class

How To Use Social Media In Class
Some teachers embrace technology and social media. Others lurk. Many ignore. So what does the average teacher do if they’re somewhere in the middle? Why, use the handy infographic from Online Colleges of course!
Below you’ll see a guide to who is using social media (pretty much everyone is aware of it) to which actual social networks they prefer.
Surprising Info

  • Most teachers don’t use Twitter. They opt for Facebook and YouTube by a large amount
  • LinkedIn is preferred over both wikis and Twitter
  • Just about every social network can play a pivotal role in education, so it’s time to start learning about all of them!

Full Text: 25 Ways Teachers Can Integrate Social Media Into Education | Edudemic.

Digital media get top marks as they bring a new kind of learning into the classroom

Teacher with students in a computer lab

Figures just released from Ofcom’s annual communications market report highlighted the fact that last year, for the first time, the amount of time we spent talking on mobile phones fell. However, that doesn’t mean we’re not communicating: the report also suggested that some 96 per cent of 16- to 24-year-olds are using digital media to stay in touch with friends and family on a daily basis.
Given that, it’s hardly surprising that digital and social media are becoming more and more widely used in schools and universities.
In fact, institutions around the UK are bringing students new learning experiences via digital media. A recent example saw 9,000 students from 140 schools watch a webcast of Tim Crouch’s play I, Cinna, based on the misadventures of a lowly character from Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, then writing their own poems and prose in response and taking part in a live Q&A with the actor and director.
Full Text: Digital media get top marks as they bring a new kind of learning into the classroom – Education – News – Evening Standard.

Using Facebook to build community in large college classes

FAcebook
Although it is often said that the academy moves slowly, very slowly, I never really thought about myself as a “slow mover” with regard to pedagogy in the classroom. But when the idea of using social media (e.g., Facebook) as part of my face-to-face classes was suggested to me about two years ago, I found myself in the slow lane.
Luckily, about a year ago I saw the proverbial light. It was then that I had a frank conversation with a colleague about the value of using Facebook (Fb) in my classes.
Full Text: Using Facebook to build community in large college classes (essay) | Inside Higher Ed.

What If Teens Prefer Twitter to Facebook?


A member of my wife’s family and a few of her friends told me recently that they are enamored with Twitter. They love its rapid-fire updates, and the sense Twitter provides of being right in the moment. Over a weekend they were constantly checking and posting updates on their smartphones, and when it came to socializing with friends, she and her peers simply preferred Twitter to Facebook.
This isn’t earth-shattering news, but here’s the catch – all were in high school. Teen social media users seem to be flocking to Twitter right now, continuing a trend over the past two years, and reducing Facebook usage in favor of the 140-character social network. We’ve seen such a shift in preference before, when users flocked to Facebook over Myspace in 2007. History may be on the verge of another social platform shift, and brands can’t be caught flat-footed when it comes to marketing to the younger generation.
Full Text: What If Teens Prefer Twitter to Facebook? | DigitalNext: A Blog on Emerging Media and Technology – Advertising Age.