Tag Archives: Schools

Putting Personality into Online Teaching | EDU News

Putting Personality into Online Teaching . By Michael Keathley.
This post is a bit embarrassing for me as it involves a bit of confession. About 12 years ago when I was forced to add online courses to the English, humanities, and foreign language departments I chaired, one of my first thoughts was vain and self-absorbed. Perhaps like many instructors who evolved their teaching artistry in an era where the “sage on the stage” turned into the coach on the side, I truly believed my students needed to be motivated and inspired by the dynamism and energy I brought to our learning team face-to-face (F2F). I wondered: How can I do this in a virtual class? How can a course be reduced to just black font within a white computer window?
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Putting Personality into Online Teaching | EDU News

The secret to e-learning


Via The Guardian:
Online courses are on the rise as firms continue to cut training budgets and the newly redundant update their skill sets Your desk may overlook the desolate edge-of-town business park and the only lunch venue is the canteen, but look on the bright side: you could spend your meal break browsing a book from the New York public library, absorbing an Oxford University lecture on the fall of the Roman empire or taking a short course to enhance your mastery of Excel. Immobilised office workers can nowadays roam the intellectual world courtesy of the internet and can foster passions or update skills in brief, instant gobbets when their in-tray allows, instead of committing themselves to a strict academic timetable. Now the economic downturn has forced firms to reduce staff training and the newly redundant have to rethink their skills to impress potential employers, online resources are likely to become crucial. “This is the time when people are thinking about their skills sets, either because they want to get a better job or because they want to learn more about, say, Renaissance art,,” says Adrian Beddow of Learndirect , which offers a range of downloadable e-courses covering corporate skills from IT to employment law
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The secret to e-learning

Children with internet access at home gain exam advantage, charity says


Via The Guardian:
The e-Learning Foundation says pupils whose families have a computer are likely to achieve a higher grade A million children’s exam results will be on average a grade lower than their peers this year because they do not have internet access at home, according to a leading charity. The e-Learning Foundation says that children without access to a computer in the evening are being increasingly disadvantaged in the classroom. Research suggests that 1.2 million teenagers log on to revision pages every week and those using online resources were on average likely to attain a grade higher in exams
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Children with internet access at home gain exam advantage, charity says

Teachers must think internet-first


Via The Guardian:
Giving everyone digital skills is a key factor in tackling long-term unemployment, argues Martha Lane Fox Last week, the CBI pressed the government to apply the same rigour to tackling long-term unemployment as it has shown to reducing the deficit. The scale of the challenge certainly warrants such a focus. In the UK, 2.46 million people are unemployed; 5 million people of working age are on benefits and 2 million children live in households where nobody works. These statistics carry a huge economic and social cost: for society and government, for families and for the individual.
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Teachers must think internet-first

No escape from turning up to class


Via The Guardian:
Enthusiasm for virtual learning is limited, say Ofsted School inspectors yesterday dampened ministers’ hopes that tens of thousands of students would soon be logging on to online classrooms. Ofsted said many schools and colleges in England were reluctant to embrace new technology which enables teaching and learning to continue online and out-of-hours
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No escape from turning up to class

IPad 2 Inches Towards Educational Needs

Apple’s iPad has captivated the attention of educators since its inception with the attractive possibility of ever-expanding learning applications and highly portable hardware. This focused attention generated a lot of feedback from educators, which Apple seems to have taken to heart in designing the second generation of the popular tablet. As educator use of the iPad 2 increases, so do the reviews vaunting its usefulness in revolutionizing today’s educational media approaches.
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Danish schools ready to trial internet access during exams


Via The Guardian:
Each summer we’re subjected to a string of arguments over whether getting an A-level or GCSE is getting easier. But thanks to officials in Denmark, it may be time to stop talking about dumbing down exams and start talking about wiring them up instead. According to reports in the Danish media, ministers are about to trial a system where A-level students are allowed to take internet-connected computers into exams. The reason, say officials, is that collecting facts and figures is now a task best left to computers – and that youngsters taking exams shouldn’t necessarily be blocked from one of the tools they are routinely expected to use in their studies. “It is a good way to get historical facts or an article that may be useful in a written civics exam, for example,” Søren Vagner, a consultant with the Ministry of Education told Danish newspaper MetroXpress last week. At a simple level, this makes a lot of sense. The internet is now such a powerful research tool that it has done away with lots of the old methods like learning by rote – turning facts into commodities in the same way that calculators dispense with some basic mathematical activities. Why bother remembering facts and figures when you can call them up on demand with a computer? There are a number of potential pitfalls, however, not least protecting against plagiarism and the problem of students lifting information from online sources to pad out work. Vagner was quoted as saying that examiners would keep a close eye on what students submitted, and would conduct regular, randomised checks of the web pages that they had used in the course of their research to keep tabs. Checking for plagiarism is relatively easy, of course (a simple web search for groups of words would do half the job) and web-based plagiarism is something that schools are already trying to cope with . But the biggest problem is one that doesn’t seem to be addressed: the possibility for students (or other people) to collude over their exams.
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Danish schools ready to trial internet access during exams