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The secret to e-learning

Via The Guardian:

Online courses are on the rise as firms continue to cut training budgets and the newly redundant update their skill sets Your desk may overlook the desolate edge-of-town business park and the only lunch venue is the canteen, but look on the bright side: you could spend your meal break browsing a book from the New York public library, absorbing an Oxford University lecture on the fall of the Roman empire or taking a short course to enhance your mastery of Excel. Immobilised office workers can nowadays roam the intellectual world courtesy of the internet and can foster passions or update skills in brief, instant gobbets when their in-tray allows, instead of committing themselves to a strict academic timetable. Now the economic downturn has forced firms to reduce staff training and the newly redundant have to rethink their skills to impress potential employers, online resources are likely to become crucial. “This is the time when people are thinking about their skills sets, either because they want to get a better job or because they want to learn more about, say, Renaissance art,,” says Adrian Beddow of Learndirect , which offers a range of downloadable e-courses covering corporate skills from IT to employment law

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The secret to e-learning

Children with internet access at home gain exam advantage, charity says

Via The Guardian:

The e-Learning Foundation says pupils whose families have a computer are likely to achieve a higher grade A million children’s exam results will be on average a grade lower than their peers this year because they do not have internet access at home, according to a leading charity. The e-Learning Foundation says that children without access to a computer in the evening are being increasingly disadvantaged in the classroom. Research suggests that 1.2 million teenagers log on to revision pages every week and those using online resources were on average likely to attain a grade higher in exams

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Children with internet access at home gain exam advantage, charity says

Which? panel questions brain training claims

Via The Guardian:

Evidence for games is weak, says Which? report

Experts say they are no better than a crossword People who spend money on “brain trainers” to keep their minds agile may get the same results by simply doing a crossword or surfing the internet, according to research published today. A panel of experts, including eminent neuroscientists, found there was no scientific evidence to support a range of manufacturers’ claims that the gadgets can help improve memory or stave off the risk of illnesses such as dementia …

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Which? panel questions brain training claims