Tag Archives: Higher education

Webinar: Embracing Technology To Promote Exceptional Student Services In Higher Education

Embracing Technology To Promote Exceptional Student Services In Higher Education

Wednesday, June 5, 3:00-4:30pm EDT

online webinar

Host: Innovative Educators

http://www.innovativeeducators.org/product_p/1036.htm

NOTE: Payment is not required prior to event date. The recording is included and is accessible for one full year.

OVERVIEW

This webinar will offer participants an overview of the online self-services and other technology initiatives that higher education institutions are
developing and providing for their students and their families. Learn more about how technology is shaping the student experience with financial aid, electronic billing and payments, graduation planning, and more. Through strategic design and implementation of technology tools, administrators can promote increased efficiencies, improve retention and graduation rates, and promote student success.

The presenter will discuss various online student self-services and web applications that have proved successful for students to help manage the business of being a student, including a look into student portals and mobile device initiatives that have been developed to provide personalized information and communications to students. Online views of various University of Minnesota web applications and technology tools that have been highly successful in terms of quality student services and creating efficiencies will also be reviewed.

OBJECTIVES

  • Self-service options that institutions have developed to assist with customer service strategies including self-service financial aid planning,
    registration/graduation planning, and customer service relationship software
  • How to leverage technology into seamless self-service Web applications that bring students from “in line” to “online”
  • Examples of cutting-edge technology initiatives for student services including student portals and mobile device initiatives
  • About specific web applications and technology tools that have been highly successful at the University of Minnesota

WHO IS THE SPEAKER?

Julie Selander has worked in higher education administration and finance for over 25 years. Her experience includes student loan servicing operations, tuition payment plan sales and marketing, organizational leadership, as well as various management positions in higher education student services including student accounts receivable, billing, collections, financial aid, and customer service.

Julie is the director of the One Stop Student Services Office at the University of Minnesota providing seamless and integrated student services in the areas of enrollment, registration, financial aid, billing, student accounts receivable, and student veterans services. Twenty-seven One Stop Counselors across three campus locations provide service via phone, e-mail, and in-person for over 51,000 students on the Twin Cities campus.

Julie presents frequently on various topics related to higher education student services and has written several articles for publication, including NACUBO’s Student Centered Financial Services: Innovations That Succeed. She serves as a board member for Minnesota’s College Goal Sunday initiative and is a founding member and on the board of directors for the Institute for Student Services Professionals. She has undergraduate and master’s degrees from the University of Minnesota and is currently working on her dissertation as a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Minnesota in the Higher Education Policy and Administration program. She is also an instructor at the University of Minnesota in the Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Administration department and teaches Customer Service Training to undergraduate students.

Enquiries: pam@ieinfo.org

Web address: http://www.innovativeeducators.org/product_p/1036.htm

Sponsored by: Innovative Educators

NMC Horizon Report 2013 Higher Ed Edition

NMC Horizon Report 2013 Higher Ed Edition

The NMC Horizon Report > 2013 Higher Education Edition is a collaborative effort between the NMC and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI), an EDUCAUSE Program, and is slated to be released in February 2013.

The tenth edition will describe annual findings from the NMC Horizon Project, a decade-long research project designed to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on learning, teaching, and creative inquiry in higher education. Six emerging technologies are identified across three adoption horizons over the next one to five years, as well as key trends and challenges expected to continue over the same period, giving campus leaders and practitioners a valuable guide for strategic technology planning.

The 2013 Horizon Project Higher Education Advisory Board initially voted on the top 12 emerging technologies — the result of which is documented in this a interim report: the NMC Horizon Project Short List > 2013 Higher Education Edition. This Short List then helped the advisory board narrow down the 12 technologies to six for the full publication. Those results are available in the official Preview. View the work that produced these findings at www.horizon.wiki.nmc.org.

Download the Short List PDF
Download the Preview PDF

Democratizing Higher Education: The Rapidly Changing Face of Online Learning

Learning

Imagine a world in which the best possible quality in higher education is available to all students, even those in the most remote parts of the planet, and you enter the world of MOOCs. There certainly has been a very intense buzz lately about the efficacy and future potential of MOOCs as the new wave in higher education reform. For those that don’t already know the moniker, MOCCs are “massive open online courses” offered by and in conjunction with some of the highest ranking, most elite universities in the U.S. The rapid rise of these online courses does not diminish the importance of institutions of higher learning, but it surely has begun to shake things up.

Up until now we characterized online learning as “non-traditional” however, there is a paradigm shift happening, as the undemocratic costs of higher learning have reached the breaking point. MOOCs offer a rapidly growing alternative. The trend is overwhelmingly gaining popularity as a way to level the playing field in a world where elite universities have the monopoly on the highest quality education at equally exorbitant prices.

And this is where it gets interesting.

Read More: Democratizing Higher Education: The Rapidly Changing Face of Online Learning | Academic Exchange.

Can E-Learning Lead Higher Ed into the Future?

“Who will lead the way for innovation in education?” This is one of the big questions concerning higher education as the 21st century moves into its second decade. In a general sense, it would seem that brick-and-mortar institutions would be at the forefront of such innovation given their resources, easy face-to-face collaboration and infrastructure. The question remains though, are such institutional structures really supportive of innovation or is there a better alternative?

Bright ideas

In contrast to traditional higher education, online learning is well-positioned to address shifting paradigms in regards to what education, learning, and knowledge look like in the 21st century. Because it is delivered via the Internet, it is also naturally aligned to the use of innovative technology such as social media, blogs, Wikis and other collaborative tools. Where the real benefit lies however, is in how well-equipped e-learning is to adapt to the rapid pace of technological change in the world.

Full Text: Can E-Learning Lead Higher Ed into the Future? » Online Universities.

Using Facebook to build community in large college classes

FAcebook

Although it is often said that the academy moves slowly, very slowly, I never really thought about myself as a “slow mover” with regard to pedagogy in the classroom. But when the idea of using social media (e.g., Facebook) as part of my face-to-face classes was suggested to me about two years ago, I found myself in the slow lane.

Luckily, about a year ago I saw the proverbial light. It was then that I had a frank conversation with a colleague about the value of using Facebook (Fb) in my classes.

Full Text: Using Facebook to build community in large college classes (essay) | Inside Higher Ed.

First Do No Harm: New Evidence on Online Learning in Higher Education

Strong opinions abound on the subject of online learning in American higher education.  Proponents see it as a transformative, disruptive wave of the future, whereas skeptics see it as an effort to slash costs, regardless of the impact on students.

Surely some forms of online instruction—such as posting videos of a mediocre instructor on a poorly designed website—are inferior to traditional, face-to-face instruction.  But what about more sophisticated, interactive online learning systems?  There is little rigorous evidence on this subject, especially at traditional public university campuses.

Full Text: First Do No Harm: New Evidence on Online Learning in Higher Education | Brookings Institution.

The Transition from Distance to Online Education: Perspectives from the Educational Management Horizon

Tor Söderström [tor.soderstrom@pedag.umu.se],
Jörgen From [jorgen.from@pedag.umu.se],
Jeanette Lövqvist [jeanette.lovqvist@pedag.umu.se],
Anette Törnquist [anette.tornquist@pedag.umu.se],
Department of Education, Umeå University, Sweden

Abstract

In Sweden, higher education has moved away from distance education, including physical meetings, to online education with no physical meetings at all. This article focuses on the shift from distance to online education using an educational management perspective that is based on economic, staff, and student data collected between 1994 and 2010 (Department of Education, Umeå University). The results showed that in 2005, the number of distance education students increased significantly. In 2007, when all distance courses shifted to online courses, the number of students increased even further. The online courses attract many more students compared to traditional campus courses. Overall, the transition from distance to online courses has contributed to more students, an economy of scale that makes it possible to increase pedagogic development work. The online courses have also contributed to better working conditions for teachers. Without a deliberate educational management strategy, general educational courses might have been discontinued, a choice that would threaten the study of education as an academic discipline per se. As a result of these conditions, we believe ICT pedagogical development needs technical and pedagogical support as well as strategic leadership.

Full Text: European Journal of Open, Distance and E-Learning.

Top-Ten IT Issues in Higher Ed

EDUCAUSE Review

The EDUCAUSE annual publication of the most pressing issues for IT leaders in higher education.

  1. Updating IT professionals’ skills and roles to accommodate emerging technologies and changing IT management and service delivery models
  2. Supporting the trends toward IT consumerization and bring-your-own device
  3. Developing an institution-wide cloud strategy
  4. Improving the institution’s operational efficiency through information technology
  5. Integrating information technology into institutional decision-making
  6. Using analytics to support critical institutional outcomes
  7. Funding information technology strategically
  8. Transforming the institution’s business with information technology
  9. Supporting the research mission through high-performance computing, large data, and analytics
  10. Establishing and implementing IT governance throughout the institution

Sneak Peek: EDUCAUSE Top-Ten IT Issues 2012 Teaser from EDUCAUSE on Vimeo.

A quick look at the first three issues on the list.

Full Text: Top-Ten IT Issues, 2012 EDUCAUSE Review | EDUCAUSE .

Barriers to Adoption of Online Learning Systems in U.S. Higher Education

This Ithaka S+R report is a landscape review of important developments in online learning today.  It is the first in a series that will provide leaders in higher education with lessons learned from existing online learning efforts to help accelerate productive use of these systems in the future.  The goal of this research was to understand what benefits colleges and universities expect from online learning technologies, what barriers they face in implementing them, and how these technologies might be best shaped to serve different types of institutions.

Even though there are many “online courses” in existence today, the environment for systems that support interactive learning online (ILO)—those that are full-featured and used by teaching institutions to assist in the effective delivery of credit-bearing courses—is at a very early stage of development. Ithaka S+R worked with leaders, administrators, faculty members, and other key stakeholders to investigate the potential for the use of these delivery systems.

Two important findings came out of this work: 1. the need for open, shared data on student learning and performance that are created through ILO; 2. the need for investment in the creation of sustainable and customizable platforms for delivering interactive online learning instruction. We hope this report will help to stimulate discussion and planning among leaders on these important topics.

This study complements Ithaka S+R’s Online Learning in Public Universities research project, which is testing the effectiveness of interactive online learning systems, and builds on Ithaka S+R’s experience with open courseware initiatives such as those profiled in Unlocking the Gates.

Download

Barriers to Adoption of Online Learning Systems in U.S. Higher Education

Full Text: Ithaka :: Barriers to Adoption of Online Learning Systems in U.S. Higher Education.

How Higher Education Uses Social Media [INFOGRAPHIC]

Via Mashable

Schools are on a short list of organizations that have been notoriously slow to adopt emerging tech. But within the last few years, as social media becomes more integral to students’ lives, educational institutions are finally catching on, and catching up. When it comes to higher ed, there are not only opportunities for digital learning, but digital marketing too. Some schools have taken the reigns on both sides, with mixed results. SEE ALSO: 5 Free Homework Management Tools for the Digital Student The infographic below takes a look at how schools have fared with social media over the last few years — what platforms are best, where they’ve succeeded, and the challenges that lay ahead. Does your alma mater use social media effectively in the classroom and in the recruitment office? Share your social ed story in the comments. Infographic by onlineuniversities.com . Image courtesy of iStockphoto , YinYang More About: college , education , infographics , Social Media For more Social Media coverage: Follow Mashable Social Media on Twitter Become a Fan on Facebook Subscribe to the Social Media channel Download our free apps for Android , Mac , iPhone and iPad

Link:
How Higher Education Uses Social Media [INFOGRAPHIC]

Open University learning is a joy | Jules Horne

Via The Guardian:

It may not have the nightlife but as a way of accessing a flexible, quality education, I’ve found the Open University can’t be beaten He was a flying goth with rocker looks. I was a new Open University tutor researching a play. I ventured into the OU room in Second Life , and after a few introductions (He: F04 R08 . AL? Me: Yep. A363 . R11), we had a long chat about non-Euclidean geometry. Call me strange, but I found this amazingly thrilling. Living in a rural area, you don’t come across many Gauss experts. Vast academic libraries, with international journals on tap, books and courses to get your brain cranking, people who enjoy a good barney about Shakespeare’s sonnets: the OU has brought all that to my doorstep, and it’s been an absolute joy. A quick straw poll reveals quite a few of my friends are closet OU students – they just haven’t mentioned it. All over the country, distance learning is helping students overcome not just geography, but also disability, culture, financial and family circumstances. Susanne Lockie, a full-time mother to three children, told me the mental stimulation has made it a lifesaver: “I need to keep my skills ticking over, but I couldn’t study to a high level without that flexibility. I’ve been able to get credit for my previous full-time study in nursing, which was interrupted when I had a family. I’ve finished my Open degree now, but I need to spend more time with my parents at the moment, so I’m taking a year out before starting on honours.” Employers tend to be supportive of OU study, knowing that OU students are likely to be unusually determined and committed. That’s why it’s all the more disappointing when you hear lazy “not a real degree, then” comments and ancient stereotypes of tweedy tutors and chalk-and-talk TV. I’ve found the quality of OU learning materials outstanding. The modular structure means you cover the ground systematically, with a clear understanding of context. Elsewhere (I studied at Oxford), I’ve found the learning experience equally stimulating, but much more haphazard.

Read the article:
Open University learning is a joy | Jules Horne

From video marking to Second Life, technology is transforming the options for online students

Via The Guardian:

From video marking to Second Life, technology is transforming the options for online students There’s not a red pen in sight when Russell Stannard marks his master’s students’ essays – but it’s not because the students never make mistakes. Stannard doesn’t use a pen, or even paper, to give his students feedback. Instead – and in keeping with his role as principal lecturer in multimedia and ICT – he turns on his computer, records himself marking the work on-screen, then emails his students the video. When students open the video, they can hear Stannard’s voice commentary as well as watch him going through the process of marking. The resulting feedback is more comprehensive than the more conventional notes scrawled in the margin, and Stannard, who works at the University of Westminster, now believes it has the potential to revolutionise distance learning. “It started when I began to realise how useful technology can be for teaching,” he says. “I wanted to help other teachers, as well as general computer-users, to learn how to use tools like podcasting, PowerPoint and BlackBoard, software that a lot of schools and universities use to allow teachers to provide course material and communicate with students online.” Follow the mouse So he set up a site to teach people how to use the technology, providing simple, video tutorials where users watch Stannard’s mouse pointing out how to use the software, with his voice providing constant commentary. He used the screen-videoing software Camtasia, and the site rapidly took off: it now receives more than 10,000 hits a month. Then he started considering integrating the teaching style into his own university work. “I was mainly teaching students on master’s courses in media and technology, and I realised that while I was talking about the benefits of new technology, I should be making the most of the opportunity to use it,” says Stannard. “That’s when I had the idea of video marking. It was immediately well received. Students receive both aural and visual feedback – and while we always talk about different learning styles, there are also benefits to receiving feedback in different ways.” Stannard says the technology is particularly useful for dyslexic students, who appreciate the spoken commentary, and students learning English as a foreign language. “I started my teaching career in language learning, so I quickly realised that students learning English would benefit from video marking. They can replay the videos as many times as they like and learn more about reasons for their mistakes.” Stannard also believes video marking is “perfect” for distance-learning students. “It brings them much closer to the teacher,” he says. “They can listen, see and understand how the teacher is marking their piece, why specific comments have been made, and so on.” The technology is already being used for informal distance learning, as Stannard uploads the videos he makes for his lectures at Westminster to multimedia trainingvideos.com.

See the article here:
From video marking to Second Life, technology is transforming the options for online students