Tag Archives: Google

Just Google It: How Google Has Changed Research for Grad Students

Google It
Source: GradSchoolHub.com

94: percentage of U.S. students who equate research with using Google, or other search engines.
75: percentage of students who use Wikipedia and online encyclopedias.
87: the percentage of all US adults using the Internet who also use search engines.

2 billion: Or nearly 30 percent of all humans, use the Internet

A history of online research

1962: J.C.R. Licklider of MIT has “Galactic Network” concept, a globally interconnected set of computers where everyone could access data from any site.
1989: Demonstration of the World Wide Web by Tim Berners-Lee.
1990: Public release of the World Wide Web.
1990: First search tool for the web (Archie) was created.
1993: First web crawler (Wanderer) was created.
1993: First graphical browser (Mosaic).
1994: Netscape browser launched.
1994: Development of first popular search engines (Alta Vista, Lycos, Excite and Yahoo)
1995: Internet Explorer launched.
1995: First public video-conference took place.
1996: Instant messaging services launched.
1997: Google released
1997: First weblog (blog) is attributed to Jorn Barger’s Robot Wisdom Web site.
1997: SixDegrees.com is launched. Often seen as the first social networking site.
Paid placement ranking: Goto morphed into Overture and Yahoo. Ranking depended on how much you paid.
1998 +: Link based ranking pioneered by Google
• Blew away all search engines except Inktomi; meanwhile, Goto/Overture’s annual revenues were nearly $1 billion.
2000: 400 million people across the globe use the internet.
2001: First commercial launch of 3G (Third Generation) mobile phones.
2001: First Access Grid developed at the University of Manchester.
2003: Myspace launched.
2003: Yahoo acquires Overture (for paid placement) and Inktomi (search)
2004: Mozilla Firefox web browser released (the 2nd most popular current browser after Internet Explorer).
2004: Facebook launched.
2006: Twitter launched.
2007: iPhone launched.
2008: Google Chrome browser launched.
2010: iPad launched.
2011: Number of internet users estimated as 2 billion world wide.

Percentage of people who go online, then use a search engine:

Millennials, age 18-33: 92 %
Gen X (34-45): 87
Younger Boomers (45-55): 86
Older Boomers (56-64): 87
Silent Generation (65-73): 82
G.I. Generation (74 plus): 72
All online adults (18 plus): 87

The battle of the Search Engines (as of 12/13)

Google: 66.7 percent of all searches
Microsoft sites (Bing): 18.2 percent
Yahoo: 11.2
Ask: 2.6
AOL: 1.4

Number of searches (worldwide: 18.3 billion in Dec. 2013)
Google: 12.3 billion of the 18.3 (or 66.7 % see above)
Microsoft (Bing): 3.3 billion
Yahoo: 2 billion
Ask: 452 million
AOL: 234 million

Online research tools used by students

• Google or other online search engine: 94% of those surveyed
• Wikipedia or other online encyclopedias:75 %
• You Tube, or other social media sites: 52%
• News sites of major news organizations (i.e. NY Times): 25%
• Textbooks, electronic: 18%
• Databases, such as EBSCO, JSTOR: 17%

Google Research tools

Google Scholar (www.scholar.google.com) : for search of scholarly literature across many disciplines and sources, including theses, books, abstracts and articles.

Google App Engine: Google funds projects that create tools, applications and curriculum that can be used by other educators in their own teaching environments.

Google Book Search: (www.books.google.com) Search the latest index of the world’s books. Find millions of great books you can preview or read for free.

YouTube EDU: Resources for learning, from English lessons to real-life math.

Chrome’s FlashCards extension: to learn languages faster, prep for exams

Google Earth: with thousands of aerial and satellite photos, dozens of layers of information: city names, country borders, airport locations, road maps.

Google Play: has millions of FREE books readily available

Google-Changed-ResearchThumb

Sources:

https://theconversation.com/us-study-shows-google-has-changed-the-way-students-research-and-not-for-the-better-3087
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2011/08/22/erial_study_of_student_research_habits_at_illinois_university_libraries_reveals_alarmingly_poor_information_literacy_and_skills#ixzz2pd2IXJBX
http://searchengineland.com/teachers-say-students-equate-research-with-using-google-138542
http://searchengineland.com/search-number-2-online-activity-58927
http://www.stanford.edu/group/mmds/slides/raghavan-mmds.pdf
http://www.lightspeedaheadnewsletter.com/?p=317
http://www.bloomsburyacademic.com/view/What-Is-Online-Research/chapter-ba-9781849665544-chapter-002.xml?print
http://www.comscore.com/Insights/Press_Releases/2014/1/comScore_Releases_December_2013_US_Search_Engine_Rankings
The Pew Reseach Center’s Internet and American Life Project Online Survey of Teachers
http://www.teachthought.com/technology/52-google-tips-for-college-students/
https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/flashcards/diejjofgldkjkhmfjagdjdodjebpglhb?utm_source=en-social-na-us-social-gplus-post
http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2012/08/back_to_school_with_google_earth.html

8 Great Free Google Posters for your Classroom

Poster

So you want to start your next school year with a great new look for your classroom ? A look that will be technology enhanced ? Well, we have suggestions for you: [Google] posters. Posters are a great way to catch students attention  and stimulate their learning drive . When used on the classroom wall for everyone  to look at whenever they are at your class, then you can have better chances that students will grasp what those posters communicate to them.

[Provides links to the posters in PDF format]

Full Text: Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: 8 Great Free Technology Posters to Hang in your Classroom.

Using Google to Bring 21st Century Skills Into the Classroom

Students in computer lab

Professional development expert Jared Covili, author of the new book, Going Google: Powerful Tools for 21st Century Learning, describes the wide array of free Google technologies available to schools and explains how to use them to encourage teaching 21st century skills.

Full Text: Jared Covili: Using Google to Bring 21st Century Skills Into the Classroom | School Leadership Briefing.

Google World Wonders Project

What is the World Wonders Project?

The Google World Wonders Project is a platform which brings world heritage sites of the modern and ancient world online. Using Street View, 3D modeling and other Google technologies, we have made these amazing sites accessible to everyone across the globe. With videos, photos and in-depth information, you can now explore the world wonders from your armchair just as if you were there.

Why is Google doing this?

Google’s mission is to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful. With this project we want to make the world heritage sites available to everyone and to digitally preserve them for future generations. We believe that the World Wonders Project can be especially useful for students, scholars and teachers to engage in an innovative and interactive way of learning.

Who is involved?

We are working with partners including UNESCO and World Monuments Fund to support us in providing valuable information to our users.

How do I get started?

Start exploring world heritage sites by either flicking through the picture carousel on the homepage or play with the globe to discover random sites from all over the world. You can also find places by themes or locations chosen over the drop-down panel on the top of the homepage. For more guidance, please watch the website demo that can be found when you click on the “i”-icon on the homepage.

Will you be adding more world heritage sites?

We would love to bring to life all of the wonders of the modern and ancient world with this project. We will work with UNESCO and partners all over the world to continuously add more sites.

Full Text and Teacher Guides: About – Google World Wonders Project.

Going Google: Powerful Tools for 21st Century Learning [Paperback]

Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Corwin Press (March 19, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1412998786
  • ISBN-13: 978-1412998789

Editorial Reviews

Review

“This book immediately gets the savvy teacher-educator to begin identifying, exploring, planning, playing and making invaluable and challenging connections that will redefine the curricula experiences of students, teachers, and parents.” (Rose Cherie Reissman Literacy Consultant/Teacher Educator )

Going Google is a must-have for the emerging technology teacher. It addresses the applications students are using in today’s classroom and provides real, authentic ways to effectively emplys these tools to engage the leaders of tomorrow.” (Avis Canty, Special Education Teacher )

“Any educator who wants to be blown away with possibilities on how Google can support 21st Century learning should get this book!” (Sara Stewart, Project Facilitator, Instructional Technology )

“This book is an invaluable resource for a teacher who wants to incorporate more technology in the classroom by utilizing tools that he/she already has available.” (James E. Anderson, K-12 Principal )

“This book is one of the most invaluable publications for teachers today. The author has taken a totally free resource and developed an excellent reference tool which every educator should utilize.” (Karen Canfield, Elementary Principal )

“This is a GREAT book. It addresses a critical issue: how to incorporate technology into our regular classrooms, in a clean and easy style that is very accessible even to educators who are less tech-savvy!” (Rick Yee, Principal )

Going Google provides practical directions with appropriate screen shots that show readers exactly how to use the tools.” (Joan Irwin, Education Editor/Writer )

Review

“This book immediately gets the savvy teacher-educator to begin identifying, exploring, planning, playing and making invaluable and challenging connections that will redefine the curricula experiences of students, teachers, and parents.” — Rose Cherie Reissman Literacy Consultant/Teacher Educator 20111028 “Going Google is a must-have for the emerging technology teacher. It addresses the applications students are using in today’s classroom and provides real, authentic ways to effectively emplys these tools to engage the leaders of tomorrow.” — Avis Canty, Special Education Teacher 20111028 “Any educator who wants to be blown away with possibilities on how Google can support 21st Century learning should get this book!” — Sara Stewart, Project Facilitator, Instructional Technology 20111028 “This book is an invaluable resource for a teacher who wants to incorporate more technology in the classroom by utilizing tools that he/she already has available.” — James E. Anderson, K-12 Principal 20111028 “This book is one of the most invaluable publications for teachers today. The author has taken a totally free resource and developed an excellent reference tool which every educator should utilize.” — Karen Canfield, Elementary Principal 20111028 “This is a GREAT book. It addresses a critical issue: how to incorporate technology into our regular classrooms, in a clean and easy style that is very accessible even to educators who are less tech-savvy!” — Rick Yee, Principal 20111028 “Going Google provides practical directions with appropriate screen shots that show readers exactly how to use the tools.” — Joan Irwin, Education Editor/Writer 20111028

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Help your students become better searchers

Search Education – Google

Web search can be a remarkable tool for students, and a bit of instruction in how to search for academic sources will help your students become critical thinkers and independent learners.

With the materials on this site, you can help your students become skilled searchers- whether they’re just starting out with search, or ready for more advanced training.

[Includes Lesson plans & Activities and Live Training Sessions]

Full Text: Search Education – Google.

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31 Great Ways Universities Are Using Google+

Google+

Social media resources like Google Plus offer a great opportunity for growth in education through collaborative work, communication, and camaraderie. Many of today’s universities have recognized this incredible potential, and have put G+ to work on campus. We’ve discovered more than 30 great ways universities are currently using Google Plus, along with several ideas for the future. Read on to learn about the amazing possibilities that Google Plus offers for universities.

Full article 31 Great Ways Universities Are Using Google+ | Online Universities.

From video marking to Second Life, technology is transforming the options for online students

Via The Guardian:

From video marking to Second Life, technology is transforming the options for online students There’s not a red pen in sight when Russell Stannard marks his master’s students’ essays – but it’s not because the students never make mistakes. Stannard doesn’t use a pen, or even paper, to give his students feedback. Instead – and in keeping with his role as principal lecturer in multimedia and ICT – he turns on his computer, records himself marking the work on-screen, then emails his students the video. When students open the video, they can hear Stannard’s voice commentary as well as watch him going through the process of marking. The resulting feedback is more comprehensive than the more conventional notes scrawled in the margin, and Stannard, who works at the University of Westminster, now believes it has the potential to revolutionise distance learning. “It started when I began to realise how useful technology can be for teaching,” he says. “I wanted to help other teachers, as well as general computer-users, to learn how to use tools like podcasting, PowerPoint and BlackBoard, software that a lot of schools and universities use to allow teachers to provide course material and communicate with students online.” Follow the mouse So he set up a site to teach people how to use the technology, providing simple, video tutorials where users watch Stannard’s mouse pointing out how to use the software, with his voice providing constant commentary. He used the screen-videoing software Camtasia, and the site rapidly took off: it now receives more than 10,000 hits a month. Then he started considering integrating the teaching style into his own university work. “I was mainly teaching students on master’s courses in media and technology, and I realised that while I was talking about the benefits of new technology, I should be making the most of the opportunity to use it,” says Stannard. “That’s when I had the idea of video marking. It was immediately well received. Students receive both aural and visual feedback – and while we always talk about different learning styles, there are also benefits to receiving feedback in different ways.” Stannard says the technology is particularly useful for dyslexic students, who appreciate the spoken commentary, and students learning English as a foreign language. “I started my teaching career in language learning, so I quickly realised that students learning English would benefit from video marking. They can replay the videos as many times as they like and learn more about reasons for their mistakes.” Stannard also believes video marking is “perfect” for distance-learning students. “It brings them much closer to the teacher,” he says. “They can listen, see and understand how the teacher is marking their piece, why specific comments have been made, and so on.” The technology is already being used for informal distance learning, as Stannard uploads the videos he makes for his lectures at Westminster to multimedia trainingvideos.com.

See the article here:
From video marking to Second Life, technology is transforming the options for online students

New Website Connects Language Newbies With Native Speakers

Via Mashable

Name: Verbling Quick Pitch: Verbling is a web-based platform where individuals can pair up with native speakers to practice speaking new languages on live video.

Genius Idea: Verbling makes language learning easy by offering a free way to connect instantly with native speakers with timed prompts and conversation-starting topics. Verbling was launched in 2011 when co-founders Jacob Jolis and Mikael Bernstein met while attending Stanford University. The two dropped out of the prestigious school and teamed up with then-Google software engineer Fred Wulff to build the language-learning startup of their dreams. Verbling.com, a Y Combinator -backed startup, is a website that people can access globally to speak with native language speakers living in different countries. For now, only Spanish and English speakers can access video chat, but the founders hope to add Arabic, French, Chinese and German — among 10 languages in total — by the end of the year. The idea of Verbling is to solve one of the biggest problems for language learners — not being able to practice speaking with natives. People devote time and money to learning language basics, but slowly lose linguistic skills without practice. “It’s very difficult to find native speakers without going abroad,” said Bernstein who speaks English, Swedish, German and Russian. “With Verbling, you can do that instantaneously. You don’t have to schedule or waste any time trying to find someone.” Verbling is all about the trade.

Read the original post:

New Website Connects Language Newbies With Native Speakers

Why Social Media Needs to Get More Personal


Via Mashable

Patrick Moorhead is president and principal analyst at Moor Insights & Strategy, a highly regarded high-tech industry analyst firm focused on the disruptive ecosystems of smartphones, tablets, personal computers, living room devices and social media. New social media service  Path  promises to bring your true friends (not just acquaintances) together in a much more personal way. However, neither Path, nor Facebook, nor Google+ have fully comprehended that personal circles vary by context, and that context changes rapidly and infinitely.

 

In the end, while services like Path get us closer to “personal,” they are still very much “broadcast” versions of social media. Ultimately, new services will arise that will allow the user to easily and naturally build relationships, physically meet and communicate with one’s rapidly morphing groups of true friends.

     

How Humans Interact To fully understand how structured broadcast and personal social models differ, we need to look at real life. First and foremost, people segment friends and groups based on a specific context. To put it simply, there are people we are very close with, people we may have never heard of, but who seem “safe,” then there are thousands of groups in-between. And that context only changes more over time. Even though it sounds confusing, we build and segment groups because the action has been hard-wired into our brains.

The “Broadcast” Social Media Problem The Facebook, Google+ and Path networks liken online interaction to shouting in different-sized movie theaters, each of which contains a different combination of close friends, family members and acquaintances. Most people in the movie theater aren’t even listening; others listen but ignore; and an even smaller group reacts to what’s being said. For most people on the receiving end, a post is typically out of context, irrelevant, doesn’t require a response or was just plain missed. For example, some children aren’t on Facebook during school hours, and many older demographics don’t check notifications on a regular basis, or else they use their accounts for very specific purposes only.   What Defines “Personal” Today? I outlined the challenges that come with a “broadcast” model of social media. So what do I mean by “personal?” Quite simply, personal reflects how we interact in the physical world. The infinite number of groups we encounter in the everyday world communicate in a way you would expect: over the phone, through text, BlackBerry Messenger, face to face and via email. However, some of the tools we employ — even in today’s fast-paced digital environment — are slow, inefficient or even inaccessible.

For example, three families may want to go out to dinner after the eighth grade basketball game. Let’s assume there are six parents total and kids don’t get a vote. Just imagine how many texts it will take to arrange this.

See the article here:
Why Social Media Needs to Get More Personal