Tag Archives: Gamification of Learning

Jane McGonigal: The game that can give you 10 extra years of life

When game designer Jane McGonigal found herself bedridden and suicidal following a severe concussion, she had a fascinating idea for how to get better. She dove into the scientific research and created the healing game, SuperBetter. In this moving talk, McGonigal explains how a game can boost resilience — and promises to add 7.5 minutes to your life.

3 Websites for High School Teachers to Try in 2013

Credit: USNews – Teachers can tap into free Web resources to incorporate tech into their lessons.

Technology continues to make inroads into high school classrooms via bring-your-own device initiatives, 1:1 proposals that put a tablet or laptop in front of every student, and blended learning models that mix online courses with in-class instruction.

But teachers don’t need a classroom stocked with iPads to start incorporating tech into their lesson plans. In fact, 40 percent of educators say online apps and games are the most effective way to engage students, according to a reader survey by SmartBrief for EdTech, an industry newsletter.

Read more for details of three Web-based resources for high school teachers to try in 2013: 3 Websites for High School Teachers to Try in 2013 – High School Notes (usnews.com).

Money, Time, and Tactics: Can Games Be Effective in Schools?

Students playing on iPad *
Flickr:flickingerbrad

If it’s true that 97 percent of teens in the U.S. are playing digital games, then the focus on how games can fit into the shifting education system becomes that much more important. Schools, districts, and individual educators are trying to figure out how games and learning can fit into the current complicated landscape.

The newly released report Games for a Digital Age: K-12 Market Map and Investment Analysis, released by the Joan Ganz Cooney Center and the Games and Learning Publishing Council, describes the many different criteria in play in detail, including obstacles from the policy standpoint, lack of teacher development, as well as how the Bring Your Own Device movement is influencing the push towards games and learning.

“Games are more popular than ever with youth today with many students spending hours a day playing them,” said Michael H. Levine, executive director of the Joan Ganz Cooney Center. “What we don’t know yet is whether and how they can be a key ally in driving pathways to academic success.”

Though it’s well worth reading the report in its entirety, below are excerpts pulled from the report, conducted and written by Dr. John Richards, Leslie Stebbins and Dr. Kurt Moellering.

Read more: Money, Time, and Tactics: Can Games Be Effective in Schools? | MindShift.

Teacher hopes students will learn through role-playing video games

Students playing the game would be able to pick from avatars such as these to represent themselves. The game still is in development. / Photo provided by Ben Bertoli
Students playing the game would be able to pick from avatars such as these to represent themselves. The game still is in development. / Photo provided by Ben Bertoli

While many teachers would say games belong on the playground, the 23-year-old CEO of ClassRealm is aiming to bring games to the classroom.

A sixth-grade teacher and passionate gamer, Ben Bertoli wants to bring the world of video role-playing games into the realm of education.

As a first-year teacher of math, science and language arts at Danville Middle School, Bertoli was looking for a tool to help motivate students. Having spent his formative years playing Nintendo 64, he recognized that games have the power to stimulate higher performance levels under the guise of having fun — in short, a perfect medium for inspiring student performance.

Full Text: Teacher hopes students will learn through role-playing video games | Indianapolis Star | indystar.com.

A Primer on Learning Game Design (PDF)

BottomLinePerformance_gamificationOfLearning_20110929.pdf application/pdf Object

The gamification of learning is a hot, hot trend with great potential to improve the quality of learning experiences for adults – not just kids. In the corporate environment – where “rapid elearning” and the NEXT button now dominate – learning games offer a compelling difference in terms of user experience and results. We are sold on the value of games in learning, and we want to actively promote their use. This paper’s intent is to give readers basic knowledge of game design and how to get started with it.

BottomLinePerformance_gamificationOfLearning_20110929.pdf.