Tag Archives: 21st Century Learning

Going Google: Powerful Tools for 21st Century Learning [Paperback]

Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Corwin Press (March 19, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1412998786
  • ISBN-13: 978-1412998789

Editorial Reviews

Review

“This book immediately gets the savvy teacher-educator to begin identifying, exploring, planning, playing and making invaluable and challenging connections that will redefine the curricula experiences of students, teachers, and parents.” (Rose Cherie Reissman Literacy Consultant/Teacher Educator )

Going Google is a must-have for the emerging technology teacher. It addresses the applications students are using in today’s classroom and provides real, authentic ways to effectively emplys these tools to engage the leaders of tomorrow.” (Avis Canty, Special Education Teacher )

“Any educator who wants to be blown away with possibilities on how Google can support 21st Century learning should get this book!” (Sara Stewart, Project Facilitator, Instructional Technology )

“This book is an invaluable resource for a teacher who wants to incorporate more technology in the classroom by utilizing tools that he/she already has available.” (James E. Anderson, K-12 Principal )

“This book is one of the most invaluable publications for teachers today. The author has taken a totally free resource and developed an excellent reference tool which every educator should utilize.” (Karen Canfield, Elementary Principal )

“This is a GREAT book. It addresses a critical issue: how to incorporate technology into our regular classrooms, in a clean and easy style that is very accessible even to educators who are less tech-savvy!” (Rick Yee, Principal )

Going Google provides practical directions with appropriate screen shots that show readers exactly how to use the tools.” (Joan Irwin, Education Editor/Writer )

Review

“This book immediately gets the savvy teacher-educator to begin identifying, exploring, planning, playing and making invaluable and challenging connections that will redefine the curricula experiences of students, teachers, and parents.” — Rose Cherie Reissman Literacy Consultant/Teacher Educator 20111028 “Going Google is a must-have for the emerging technology teacher. It addresses the applications students are using in today’s classroom and provides real, authentic ways to effectively emplys these tools to engage the leaders of tomorrow.” — Avis Canty, Special Education Teacher 20111028 “Any educator who wants to be blown away with possibilities on how Google can support 21st Century learning should get this book!” — Sara Stewart, Project Facilitator, Instructional Technology 20111028 “This book is an invaluable resource for a teacher who wants to incorporate more technology in the classroom by utilizing tools that he/she already has available.” — James E. Anderson, K-12 Principal 20111028 “This book is one of the most invaluable publications for teachers today. The author has taken a totally free resource and developed an excellent reference tool which every educator should utilize.” — Karen Canfield, Elementary Principal 20111028 “This is a GREAT book. It addresses a critical issue: how to incorporate technology into our regular classrooms, in a clean and easy style that is very accessible even to educators who are less tech-savvy!” — Rick Yee, Principal 20111028 “Going Google provides practical directions with appropriate screen shots that show readers exactly how to use the tools.” — Joan Irwin, Education Editor/Writer 20111028

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Technology Upends Traditional Classrooms

The most impressive technology-rich classrooms don’t look like classrooms. Instead, they look like creative businesses on deadline—like advertising agencies pulling together a big campaign, architectural firms drawing up blueprints, or software companies developing new programs.

I recently visited a middle school science class as students toiled away on science fair projects using a classroom wiki: a widely adopted collaborative Web platform. As I watched, students uploaded graphic displays of their data, commented on each other’s hypotheses, and recorded video journals of their progress. The room buzzed with activity, as each of these young knowledge workers made contributions to their collective endeavor. When students got stuck, other students jumped from their desks to help. The teacher circulated through the classroom like a project manager, answering questions, providing feedback, holding students accountable to deadlines, and providing just-in-time instruction.

Full Text: Education Week: Use Technology to Upend Traditional Classrooms.

What should students learn in the 21st century?

It has become clear that teaching skills requires answering “What should students learn in the 21st century?” on a deep and broad basis. Teachers need to have the time and flexibility to develop knowledge, skills, and character, while also considering the meta-layer/fourth dimension that includes learning how to learn, interdisciplinarity, and personalisation. Adapting to 21st century needs means revisiting each dimension and how they interact:

Full Text: OECD educationtoday: What should students learn in the 21st century?.

21st Century Learning…blah blah blah

Right now you probably hear as many people talk about how annoyed they are with the term “21st Century Learning” as you will hear people talking about the importance of it.  I will have to admit, I am in the “annoyed” camp.

We often talk about these ideals of what “21st Century Learning” will look like but I think we can start with something much simpler.  We should start asking, “How do we ourselves best engage in our own learning?”

I was reminded of this the other day while at a conference and the presenter started the session by saying, “I would like to start by asking everyone to put away their mobile devices.”  The room was split down the middle with those who were offended by his statement, and those that knew he was joking.  Educators as learners would often be offended if we were told the tools or way that we are allowed to learn at any point, yet often many do not flinch at asking their kids to do the same.

Full Text: 21st Century Learning…blah blah blah.

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