Category Archives: Publications

Amazon.com: How to Succeed at e-Learning

Via Scoop.itThe eLearning Site

Peter Donnelly, Paul Kirk, Joel Benson

Publication Date: August 21, 2012 | ISBN-10: 0470670231 | ISBN-13: 978-0470670231 | Edition: 1

 

With undergraduate and postgraduate curricula increasingly delivered or supported by electronic means, it is time for both learners and teachers to develop the specific skills that are essential to successful e-learning, but seldom taught in medical school. This concise guide, based on the authors’ experience in e-learning, is accessible to any novice and supplies a basic grounding in using technology to learn, to teach, and to conduct research.

 

Paperback: 176 pagesPublisher: Wiley-Blackwell; 1 edition (August 21, 2012)Language: English

 

Via www.amazon.com

ScienceDirect.com – Journal of Systems and Software – Blackboard architecture to integrate components and agents in heterogeneous distributed eLearning systems: An application for learning to program

Via Scoop.itThe eLearning Site

Francisco Jurado, Miguel A. Redondo, Manuel Ortega, Blackboard architecture to integrate components and agents in heterogeneous distributed eLearning systems: An application for learning to program, Journal of Systems and Software, Available online 18 February 2012, ISSN 0164-1212, 10.1016/j.jss.2012.02.009.

 

Abstract: To build complete and complex eLearning systems, eLearning engineers are used to applying standards that facilitate sharing information as well as distributed service-oriented architectures that provide reuse and interoperability by means of component integration. These concepts lead us to a Component-based Development Process that will allow us to implement tools that give full support to the teaching/learning process, taking advantage of the synergy effect created by the integration of the different components. Thus, throughout this article we analyse the proposals from the most relevant consortia concerned with eLearning standards, showing their service oriented approaches and the middleware technologies which can be used to implement them. This analysis will demonstrate that the use of middleware technologies that use the definition of services’ interface can limit the reuse and interoperability requisites desired by the main standards consortia. Then, we will show a proposal which tries to solve this shortfall, using a blackboard-based architecture for integrating and communicating heterogeneous distributed components, as well as a user environment that also allows us to perform component integration. As an example, we will demonstrate how we have built an application for learning to program by applying our approach and following a Component-based Development Process to implement different components (services, agents, clients, etc.) that integrate it. Hence, we will argue that using blackboard architecture and a Component-based Development Process helps us to solve the identified shortcomings.

Via www.sciencedirect.com

Special Issue on: "eLearning and corporate eWorking" – IJIIE

Via Scoop.itThe eLearning Site
International Journal of Innovation in Education (IJIIE) Call for Papers Special Issue on: “eLearning and corporate eWorking” Guest Editor: Prof. Dr. Heike Wiesner, Berlin School of Economics, Germany This special issue explores the technological, educational, social, political and academic effects of eLearning or eWorking for teaching and learning. In particular, it is keen to examine various advantages, tensions, dilemmas and contradictions experienced by educators, teachers and students working with heterogeneous yet collaborative interactive media in the context of eLearning or corporate eWorking. The topic involves complex and multi-faceted challenges such as education policies, curriculum reforms, legal issues, learning methods. Moreover, the challenges faced may differ from educational institution to educational institution in each country, and from country to country. Therefore, concepts will have to take into account the specific technological nature and cultural setting of the interactive media in education in question, the context it is located, the teachers’ and the students’ profiles, the historical background of the country or region, local habits, needs and practices, ethics and also religious beliefs. The issue welcomes original papers in theoretical development and empirical research, case studies and discussion papers dealing with challenges and frontiers of eLearning and/or corporate eWorking.
Via beamtenherrschaft.blogspot.com

Learners' Participation, Retention and Success in e-learning: An Annotated Bibliography – Education Counts

Via Scoop.itThe eLearning Site
Publication Details: This report gives an overview of the literature on tertiary learners’ participation, retention and success in e-learning. We selected a large selection of research literature which consisted of both published research from journals, books and the internet and ‘grey’ literature that included project reports, unpublished theses and dissertations and reports commissioned by government agencies.   Author(s): Peter Guiney, Tertiary Sector Performance Analysis Date Published: February 2012   Key Findings: The key finding of this annotated bibliography are: – Teaching practices and pedagogies, institutional support and student characteristics and attitudes are all critical in tertiary learners’ retention and success in e-learning. Of particular importance are appropriate teacher-student interactions. Courses need to be designed to incorporate e-learning’s strengths. This includes selecting appropriate technology and ensuring that e-learning is linked to assessments and authentic learning experiences.   – For best results, institutions need to provide ‘user-friendly’ systems, processes and appropriate pastoral and technical support. Students also need motivation, self-direction and independence as well as having prior experience in e-learning. Students with positive attitudes towards technology tend to do better in e-learning than learners with negative attitudes towards technology.   – E-learning provides additional flexibility to traditional delivery by allowing students to study at a time, place and pace of their choosing. E-learning can also reduce isolation by better connecting learners to their peers, teachers and institutions – especially for learners studying part-time or through distance education.   – E-learning can provide greater access to a wider range of resources and experts than is available through traditional delivery. The fact that all students can equally access these experts and resources is of benefit to non-mainstream learner groups e.g. disabled students.   – The evidence supporting younger learners being more successful than their older peers in e-learning is inconclusive. While some studies support the assertion that younger learners are more effective in e-learning, others do not.
Via www.educationcounts.govt.nz

What Forty Years of Research Says About the Impact of Technology on Learning

Via Scoop.itThe eLearning Site
REVIEW OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH March 2011 vol. 81 no. 1 4-28 Authors: Rana M. Tamim, Hamdan Bin Mohammed,Robert M. Bernard, Eugene Borokhovski, Philip C. Abrami, Richard F. Schmid Abstract This research study employs a second-order meta-analysis procedure to summarize 40 years of research activity addressing the question, does computer technology use affect student achievement in formal face-to-face classrooms as compared to classrooms that do not use technology? A study-level meta-analytic validation was also conducted for purposes of comparison. An extensive literature search and a systematic review process resulted in the inclusion of 25 meta-analyses with minimal overlap in primary literature, encompassing 1,055 primary studies. The random effects mean effect size of 0.35 was significantly different from zero. The distribution was heterogeneous under the fixed effects model. To validate the second-order meta-analysis, 574 individual independent effect sizes were extracted from 13 out of the 25 meta-analyses. The mean effect size was 0.33 under the random effects model, and the distribution was heterogeneous. Insights about the state of the field, implications for technology use, and prospects for future research are discussed.
Via rer.sagepub.com

Mobile Learning: A Handbook for Educators and Trainers (The Open and Flexible Learning Series) – Agnes Kukulska-Hulme; John Traxler download, read, buy online | e-Books

Via Scoop.itThe eLearning Site
Abstract: This book is a timely introduction to the emerging field of mobile learning, explaining the technologies involved, their applications and the multiple effects on pedagogical and social practice Mobile devices include handheld computers, smartphones and PDAs, and this book will emphasise the issues of usability, accessibility, evaluation and effectiveness, drawing from case studies written by researchers and practitioners
Via lewisbookz.info